Improve literacy with speech to print spelling instruction

Can systematic and explicit spelling instruction improve reading?

YES! 

“Spelling and reading build and rely on the same mental representation of a word. Knowing the spelling of a word makes the representation of it sturdy and accessible for fluent reading.” Catherine Snow et al. How Spelling Supports Reading and Why it is More Regular and Predictable Than You May Think by: Lousia C. Moats, American Educator 2005/2006

What's Covered?

Silver Moon® Spelling Rules, Set 1
Concepts Covered
◆ Closed and open syllable patterns
◆ Syllable division rules for closed and open syllables
◆ Explicit instruction on 21 systematic spelling rules for closed and open syllables including schwa patterns
◆ Learning targets, pre/post tests, and independent practice pages
Silver Moon® Spelling Rules, Set 2
Concepts Covered
◆ Sticky units (ing, ang, ong, ung, etc), silent e, and consonant l+e, syllable patterns
◆ Syllable division rules for sticky units, silent e, and consonant l+e syllable patterns
◆ Explicit instruction on 14 systematic spelling rules including 15 units of sound (ing, ang, ong, etc.)
◆ Learning targets, pre/post tests, and independent practice pages
Silver Moon® Spelling Rules, Set 3
Concepts Covered
◆ R controlled and vowel team syllable patterns
◆ Syllable division rules for R controlled and vowel team patterns
◆ Bossy W patterns for reading and spelling
◆ Explicit instruction on 11 systematic spelling rules and 11 additional mini lessons
◆ Student and teacher "Spelling Choices Chart"
◆ Learning targets, pre/post tests, and independent practice pages

SETTING: General Education/Whole Group Instruction

Pacing for Set 1:
Your students are not struggling learners and they are able to complete approximately one new lesson every week provided they receive 100 minutes of dedicated instruction weekly. This could be 20 minutes 5 times weekly, 50 minutes 2 times weekly, or 33 minutes 3 times weekly. Teachers use one week in between each part (3 parts total) for review and extension activities. At this rate, with 21 lessons total, it would take approximately 24 weeks to finish Set 1.

Pacing for Set 2:
Your students are not struggling learners and they are able to complete approximately one new lesson every week provided they receive 100 minutes of dedicated instruction weekly. This could be 20 minutes 5 times weekly, 50 minutes 2 times weekly, or 33 minutes 3 times weekly. Teachers use one week in between each section (3 total) for review and extension activities. At this rate, with 14 lessons total, it would take approximately 17 weeks to finish Set 2.

Pacing for Set 3:
Your students are not struggling learners and they are able to complete approximately one new lesson every week provided they receive 100 minutes of dedicated instruction weekly. This could be 20 minutes 5 times weekly, 50 minutes 2 times weekly, or 33 minutes 3 times weekly. You use one week in between each of the three sections, in the manual, for review and extension activities. At this rate, with 11 lessons total, it would take approximately 14 weeks to finish Set 3. As an added bonus, Set 3, offers 11 mini-lessons to extend learning. If instructors choose to cover all 11 mini lessons this would add 11 weeks (plus or minus).

Email the Silver Moon® team to discuss remote learning options!

SETTING: Intervention/Small Group Instruction

There are three paths you can choose for implementation in this setting.

     ➤ Path 1: Use Silver Moon® from cover to cover, as written, in order of presentation.

     ➤ Path 2: Dovetail Silver Moon® lessons into your current reading intervention’s scope and sequence. This allows you to pair your reading instruction with your spelling instruction.

     ➤ Path 3: Use our Structured Literacy (OG) lesson template with Silver Moon®’s scope and sequence. Silver Moon® lessons will be used in the order of presentation, but teachers will extend the lesson to include a 3 part drill and additional reading components such as phrase reading, sentence reading, story reading. Request our lesson template by email.

Pacing for Sets 1 - 3
Your students are struggling readers and/or spellers. They will take longer to progress and will need more repeated practice and review. They will also need dedicated lessons for explicit instruction on syllable types and division rules.

Pacing will greatly vary depending on the path you choose and the student(s) you are working with. For this reason, it’s recommended that you start with the general education/whole group pacing recommendations and plan to add additional weeks to complete each level. If you want to fast forward progress, it’s recommended to add additional weekly minutes.

Email the Silver Moon® team to discuss remote learning options!

SETTING: University Level (undergraduate or post baccalaureate)

Silver Moon® is currently being used for undergraduate and graduate level literacy courses in special education and for practicum/clinical experiences.

Description
Give teachers the knowledge and tools necessary to improve student spelling accuracy and word level reading by explicitly and systematically teaching American English spelling rules. Participants will gain an understanding of the importance of foundational spelling and reading skills such as phonemic awareness, basic auditory discrimination skills, alphabetic principle, phonics, syllable types, syllable division rules, and word structure. Using Silver Moon® curriculum to teach these concepts has the added benefit of giving students exposure and experience using lesson plans that are Orton Gillingham based - explicit, simultaneously multisensory, systematic and cumulative. Silver Moon® is lightly scripted, therefore it lends itself nicely to training purposes.

Contact our team at Silver Moon® to request a sample of university level course objectives. Professors and adjuncts who are considering Silver Moon® for their literacy courses can submit a request for sample curriculum using our contact form.

Research

Pedagogical & content knowledge is of utmost importance for our teachers. Research “suggests that even experienced, credentialed teachers often have great difficulty with tasks measuring phonics knowledge or understanding of phonemic awareness.”
Resource: The Power of RTI and Reading Profiles, Spear-Swerling, 2014
“Brain images of children with dyslexia taken before they received spelling instruction show that they have different patterns of neural activity than do good spellers when doing language tasks related to spelling. But after specialized treatment
emphasizing the letters in words, they showed similar patterns of brain activity. These findings are important because they show the human brain can change and normalize in response to spelling instruction, even in dyslexia, the most common
learning disability...spelling development progresses through three stages - phonological, orthographic and morphological...After receiving the orthographic instruction that emphasized strategies for focusing on and remembering the letters in written words, the brain activity of the dyslexic children changed to more closely resemble that of the good spellers. The children's spelling on a standardized test also improved...”
Resource: Brain Images Show Individual Dyslexic Children Respond to Spelling Treatment: Medical News Today, February 2006
Research taken from, The Journal of Neurolinguistics, January 2006

“Poor spellers have trouble remembering the letters in words because they have trouble noticing, remembering, and recalling the features of language that those letters represent. Most commonly, poor spellers have weaknesses in underlying language skills including the ability to analyze and remember the individual sounds (phonemes) in the words...Classroom spelling programs should be organized to teach a progression of regular spelling patterns.”
Source: International Dyslexia Association, Spelling Fact Sheet

"...studies have found that effective spelling instruction explicitly teaches students sound-spelling patterns. Students are taught to think about language, allowing them to learn how to spell—not just memorize words. As a result, linguistically explicit spelling instruction improves spelling of studied words and novel words.": How Words Cast Their Spell: Spelling Is an Integral Part of Learning the Language by: R. Malatesha Joshi, Rebecca Treiman, Suzanne Carreker, and Louisa C. Moats 2009 American Educator

“Spelling and reading build and rely on the same mental representation of a word. Knowing the spelling of a word makes the representation of it sturdy and accessible for fluent reading.” Catherine Snow et al. How Spelling Supports Reading and Why it is More Regular and Predictable Than You May Think by: Lousia C. Moats, American Educator 2005/2006

“In neuroimaging studies, poor readers show atypically low activity in a part of the brain that processes the spelling of words.” Mark Seidenberg, Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can’t, and What Can Be Done About It. (2017)
“…spelling practice transfers to reading improvement in general; recent meta-analyses have shown that spelling instruction benefits word reading across the school years (Graham & Hebert, 2011), and also specifically in the elementary years (Graham & Santangelo, 2014).”
Graham, S., & Santangelo, T. (2014). Does spelling instruction make students better spellers, readers, and writers? A meta-analytic review. Reading and Writing, 27, 1703–1743. 

"Educational implications of these findings suggest that there is support for using encoding instruction to increase the literacy performances of at-risk primary grade students and that encoding instruction can be successful in improving the reading and spelling performances of older students with learning disabilities. Importantly, there is also evidence to support the transfer effects of early encoding instruction on later reading, writing, and spelling performances."
Weiser, B., & Mathes, P. (2011). Using encoding instruction to improve the reading and spelling performances of elementary students at risk for literacy difficulties: A best- evidence synthesis. Review of Educational Research. 

PreRequisite Screeners (PDF Downloads)

Are your students ready to use Silver Moon® Spelling Rules? 
Give the following screeners to ensure your students have the necessary prerequisite skills.
Auditory Discrimination Screener
DOWNLOAD
Phoneme Segmentation Screener
DOWNLOAD
Lower Case Letter Sound Assessment
Pre-Requisite Skills Summary Form
DOWNLOAD
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